Technology Transfer Newsletter
Volume 18, Number 2 - November 2001

Connecticut Transportation Institute's Technology Transfer Center
University of Connecticut, School of Engineering


PAGE 1(front cover)

Article Title: Congratulations to Our 2001 Graduates!

Article Text:
Ninety-two graduates of the Connecticut Road Master and Municipal Legal Traffic Authority programs were formally recognized at a ceremony at the University of Connecticut on September 12. The Connecticut Transportation Institute’s Technology Transfer Center staff joined friends, family and colleagues in honoring the achievements of the largest graduating class to date. Technology Transfer Center Manager, Donna Shea welcomed guest speakers Michael Turano, ConnDOT’s Director of Maintenance, and Richard Miller, New Haven’s City Engineer and the Technology Transfer Center’s Advisory Committee Chairman, who praised the graduates’ achievements and stressed the value and personal gratification of lifelong learning.

Connecticut Road Master Program
The following ninety-one individuals, comprising the sixth graduating class of the Connecticut Road Master Program, completed the program’s seven required workshops and two of five elective workshops:

  • James Alesi
    Assistant Operator
    Town of New Fairfield
  • Carl G. Almquist
    Assistant Director — Solid Waste
    Town of Groton
  • Douglas Arndt
    Operations Program Specialist
    City of Stamford
  • Brian E. Baker
    Highway Foreman
    Town of Waterford
  • Joseph Bates
    Maintenance Crew Leader
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Tim Bockus
    Operations Engineer
    Town of East Hartford
  • Frank E. Carey
    Crew Leader
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Michael J. Caruso, III
    Surveyor
    City of New Britain
  • Ronald Charter
    Construction Inspector
    Town of Manchester
  • Eric B. Christiana
    Maintainer III
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Dale P. Clark
    First Selectman
    Town of Sterling
  • Rick Conlombe
    Crew Leader
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Robert Cortello
    General Supervisor — Maintenance
    CT Department of Transportation

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PAGE 2

  • John Cottell
    Deputy Director of Public Facilities
    City of Bridgeport
  • James Crabb
    Operations Supervisor
    City of Stamford
  • Alan Craig
    Superintendent of Highways
    Town of Stratford
  • Mark Czerepuszko
    Chief Construction Inspector
    Town of Manchester
  • Kevin Darling
    Crew Leader
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Harold Dumas
    Driver/Laborer/Mechanic
    Town of Eastford
  • William Dunn, Jr.
    Foreman
    City of New Britain
  • Robert Eickenhorst, Jr.
    Maintainer III
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Salvatore Emanuele
    Superintendent
    City of Middletown
  • Leslie Feuerstein
    Crew Leader
    City of Torrington
  • Russell Franklin, III
    Crew Leader
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Daniel B. Gardner
    Crew Leader
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Peter H. Garguilo, Sr.
    Crew Leader — Special Services
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Richard E. Garvais
    Maintenance Crew Leader
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Robert Gerbert
    Operations Supervisor
    City of Stamford
  • Alexander Haddad
    Laborer
    Town of Scotland
  • John D. Haggerty, Jr.
    Crew Leader
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Richard J. Haight
    Transportation Engineer II
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Lawrence Hinchcliffe
    Foreman
    Town of New Britain
  • Douglas Hoyt
    Operations Foreman
    City of Stamford
  • Anthony Hubeny, III
    Crew Leader
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Douglas E. Humes, Jr.
    Transportation District Services Agent
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Peter Iannaccone
    Operations Foreman
    City of Stamford
  • Mark Jeffers
    Crew Leader
    Town of Farmington
  • John Johnson
    Special Equipment Operator
    City of Norwich
  • Fred Kelley, III
    Mechanic
    Town of Ridgefield
  • Raymond J. Kingston
    Contract Manager
    Town of West Hartford
  • Barry Knight
    Crew Leader
    Town of Farmington
  • Edward A. Kozlowski
    Treatment Plant Operator
    City of Milford
  • Ernest E. Lagoja
    Traffic Transportation Engineer III
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Michael J. Lamano
    Crew Leader
    CT Department of Transportation
  • John A. Leslie
    Maintenance Crew Leader
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Edwin Lieberman
    Director of Public Works
    Town of Orange
  • Brian Lister
    Landfill/Transfer Station Foreman
    City of Waterbury
  • Robert Lizotte
    Superintendent of Streets
    City of Torrington
  • Kenneth Longo
    Superintendent Machinery/Equipment
    Town of Avon
  • Sherwood Lovejoy
    Director of Public Works
    Town of Monroe
  • Gerald J. Lukowski
    Facility Manager
    City of Stamford
  • Donald Mattos, Jr.
    Driver/Maintainer
    Town of Voluntown
  • William G. McKnight
    Driver/Laborer
    Town of Ridgefield
  • Doug Metheny
    Construction Inspector
    Town of Manchester
  • Ronald J. Millovitsch
    Road Foreman
    Town of Voluntown
  • James Morris
    Driver/Laborer
    Town of Ridgefield
  • Kevin Munson
    Assistant Director of Public Works
    City of Meriden

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PAGE 3

  • Douglas M. Novak
    Manager — Special Services
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Edward Nuzenski, Jr.
    Assistant Superintendent of Streets
    City of Torrington
  • Thomas J. O’Connor
    Transportation Engineer
    CT Department of Transportation
  • George Ossola
    Assistant Director of Public Works
    Town of Cheshire
  • Peter E. Palazzi
    Service Agent
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Butch Paradis
    Operator/Maintainer
    Town of Plainville
  • Daniel Parizek
    Equipment Operator
    Town of Tolland
  • George A. Payne
    Supervisor — District Service Agent
    CT Department of Transportation
  • John Petruniw
    Equipment Operator III
    City of New Britain
  • John Phillips
    Senior Equipment Operator
    Town of West Hartford
  • William Pietrowicz
    Surveyor
    City of New Britain
  • Michael Pontello
    Driver
    Town of Ridgefield
  • Daniel Primmer
    Highway Lead Man
    Town of Portland
  • David Rizzo
    Maintainer III
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Paul T. Rizzo
    General Supervisor — Maintenance
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Gerald Rollett
    Director of Public Works
    City of Torrington
  • Donald M. Sage
    General Supervisor
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Frank Sanzo
    Assistant Highway Superintendent
    Town of Newington
  • Alphonse E. Savarese
    Town Engineer
    Town of Hamden
  • Fred W. Schaefer
    Inspector/Maintainer II
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Timothy D. Scully
    Crew Leader
    CT Department of Transportation
  • William J. Sears
    Crew Leader
    Town of Newtown
  • Chris Sherman
    Maintainer III
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Susan H. Smith
    Administration Assistant
    Town of Newington
  • Bronac Stachura
    Crew Leader
    Town of Killingly
  • Melvin C. Stead, Jr.
    Superintendent of Streets
    Town of South Windsor
  • Joseph Tavares
    Maintainer II
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Richard J. Wall, III
    Maintainer II
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Michael Widger
    Truck Driver
    Town of Plainville
  • Thomas H. Wilber
    First Selectman
    Town of Voluntown
  • James F. Wilson
    Senior Construction Inspector
    CT Department of Transportation
  • Ralph Winn
    Highway Foreman
    Town of Windsor Locks
  • Larry A. Wright
    Public Works Superintendent
    Town of Killingly
  • Philip Zoppi
    General Supervisor — Maintenance
    CT Department of Transportation

The Connecticut Road Master Program provides highway personnel with knowledge of the fundamentals of modern road maintenance management procedures and techniques. The program is designed for road maintenance supervisors at all levels and those who may assume supervisory positions in the future.

Connecticut Municipal Legal Traffic Authority Program
The following individual completed the Connecticut Municipal Legal Traffic Authority Program’s four required workshops:

Louis J. Fusaro, Sr.
Chief of Police
City of Norwich

The Connecticut Municipal Legal Traffic Authority Program is a series of workshops designed to provide municipal Legal Traffic Authorities with a fundamental knowledge of their powers and responsibilities and a background for dealing with related traffic operations problems. For more information on the Connecticut Road Master Program, the Connecticut Municipal Legal Traffic Authority Program, or any of the other training programs and services available from the Connecticut Transportation Institute’s Technology Transfer Center, please call 860-486-5400.

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PAGE 4

Article Title: By the Way...

Author: Donna Shea, Manager
Technology Transfer Center

September 26, 2001 marked the First Annual Technology Transfer Expo to be held at the University of Connecticut.

The Expo was a collaborative effort between the Technology Transfer Center and CHSSA (Connecticut Highway Street Supervisor Association).

Close to 500 attendees visited 34 vendor booths and 8 public service agency displays. Eleven of the vendors were offering participants an opportunity to view live demos of their latest equipment and technology. Visit our web site to see a list of all vendors and public service agencies that participated, along with photos of the expo. Our web site address is: www.cti.uconn.edu.

A very popular event was the Backhoe Competition that attracted 32 competitors from all over Connecticut. The University of Connecticut’s team competed for the first time and I actually got a little practice in myself. I still don’t think they will let me compete next year (the bowling ball event was not as easy as those competitors made it look). Plaques were presented for the First, Second and Third place winners. Our congratulations to:

  • 1st Place
    Cliff LaBrec, Town of Coventry
    Time: 4 minutes 33 seconds
  • 2nd Place
    Scott Rose, Sr., Town of Monroe
    Time: 6 minutes 29 seconds
  • 3rd Place
    Jay Tuttle, Town of Mansfield
    Time: 6 minutes 35 seconds

I want to take this opportunity to extend our thanks to all of the vendors who made this expo possible, to our hosts, the Connecticut Advanced Pavement Laboratory, and to the Technology Transfer Center staff and the CHSSA members who worked so hard to make this a spectacular day for all involved.

We look forward to seeing you all next year. Mark your calendars—September 18, 2002, here at UConn.

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PAGE 5

Article Title: Walking in the United States

A visit to almost any local community on a pleasant late afternoon or early evening will show that walking is clearly a popular activity, whether for recreation, exercise or simply for relaxation and enjoyment of the outdoors. However, the potential of walking as a mode of transportation is just beginning to be realized.

Results of the 1990 Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey revealed that only one out of five trips involved travel to or from work, and less than 2 percent involved on-the-job travel. The largest portion of trips (42 percent) are family or personal business travel, which includes trips to the grocery store, to the doctor or dentist, or to transport a child to school. Social or recreational travel accounts for another 25 percent of trips. This category includes visits to friends or relatives, trips to a park or sporting event, and pleasure driving and vacation travel. Overall, 7.2 percent of all trips were by walking. The survey showed that walking was a frequent component of multi-modal trips, although these accounted for only 1 percent of all trips. About one-third of the walking trips were for social or recreational purposes. Family and personal business travel, along with school and church-related travel, were also significant contributors. Average length of a walking trip was 0.6 mile.

Madison, Wisconsin, Portland, Oregon, and Boulder, Colorado are all places that enjoy relatively high levels of walking for transportation as well as recreation and fitness. These cities and many others in Europe and Asia provide strong evidence that walking is more than just a good way to stay fit and enjoy the outdoors. It is a mode of transportation that can reduce the need for automobile trips and play an important role in the overall transportation system.

Benefits of Walking
Increased levels of walking would result in significant benefits in terms of health and physical fitness, the environment and transportation-related effects. Research has shown that even low to moderate levels of exercise, such as regular walking, can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and other chronic diseases; help reduce health care costs; contribute to greater functional independence in later years of life; and, improve quality of life at every stage. Replacing automobile trips with nonmotorized and nonpolluting walking trips can yield significant environmental benefits. According to a Minnesota study, public savings from reduced pollution, oil importation, and congestion costs alone have been estimated at between 5 and 22 cents for every automobile-mile displaced by bicycling or walking. Efforts to facilitate walking can also result in more general transportation benefits besides offering additional travel options for those who are unable to drive or who choose not to drive for all or some trips. For example, measures to reduce vehicle speeds, which can encourage greater pedestrian activity in residential or downtown shopping and business areas, also impact positively on motor vehicle safety. Greenways along waterways, railway lines or other public rights-of-way yield recreational, educational, environmental, and aesthetic benefits in addition to providing corridors for walking.

Excerpted from an article by Ronald Eck, P.E. in Country Roads & City Streets, West Virginia Technology Transfer Center, Vol. 16, No. 2, July 2001.

Points to Make to Your Elected Officials

  • Walking is an excellent indicator of the quality of life in a community.
  • A vital walkable downtown or neighborhood center with attractive places to walk and shop contributes to the local economy and attracts or keeps businesses in the community.
  • A walkable community is a place where people can get to know each other.
  • Children, senior citizens and people with disabilities can get around on their own.
  • As new housing developments are designed with walking in mind, as gaps in the sidewalk system are filled and as street crossings are made safer, more short car trips can be made on foot.
  • A shift to more walking reduces air pollution, traffic congestion and parking demands.
From Arizona Milepost, Arizona Local Technical Assistance Program, Vol. 6, No. 2, Summer 2000.

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PAGE 6

Article Title: Pedestrian and Bicycle Crash Analysis Tool

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), in cooperation with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), has developed a Pedestrian and Bicycle Crash Analysis Tool (PBCAT) through the University of North Carolina Highway Safety Research Center.

What Is PBCAT?
In 1998, 5,220 pedestrians and 761 bicyclists were killed, accounting for 14 percent of all traffic fatalities. An additional 69,000 pedestrians and 53,000 bicyclists were reported to have been injured as a result of collisions with motor vehicles. PBCAT is a software product intended to assist state and local pedestrian and bicycle coordinators, planners, and engineers with this problem.

PBCAT accomplishes this goal through the development and analysis of a database containing details associated with crashes between motor vehicles and pedestrians or bicyclists. One of these details is the crash type, which describes the pre-crash actions of the parties involved. With the database developed, the software can then be used to produce reports and select countermeasures to address the problems identified.

Software Features
PBCAT is designed with the following features:

  • Ability to quickly determine the crash type through a series of on-screen questions about the crash, crash location, and maneuvers of the parties involved.
  • Ability to customize the database in terms of units of measurement, variables, and location referencing as well as import/export data from/to other data bases.
  • Ability to produce a series of tables and graphs defining the various crash types and other factors associated with the crashes such as age, sex, light condition, etc.
  • Recommended countermeasures linked to specific bicycle and pedestrian crash types and related resource and reference information.
  • User-friendly, on-line instructions and help features, including examples, along with a user’s manual.

For More Information
PBCAT is now available and includes the software and a User’s Manual. To obtain the software, visit the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center web site at: www.walkinginfo.org/pbcat

The software was developed by David L. Harkey of the University of North Carolina Highway Safety Research Center and Jim Mekemson and Min-Ching Chen of the Lendis Corporation. For more information about this product, please contact any of the individuals below:

David Harkey
University of North Carolina
Highway Safety Research Center
Phone: 919-962-8705
E-mail: david_harkey@unc.edu

Carol Tan Esse
Federal Highway Administration
Phone: 202-493-3315
E-mail: carol.tan.esse@fhwa.dot.gov

Essie Wagner
National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
Phone: 202-366-1361
E-mail: esther.wagner@nhtsa.dot.gov

From Pedestrian and Bicycle Crash Analysis Tool, Federal Highway Administration, March 2000.

Selected Pedestrian/Bicycle On-line Resources
Federal

  • FHWA Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety safety.fhwa.dot.gov/programs/ped_bike.htm
  • FHWA Pedestrian and Bicycle Safety Research www.tfhrc.gov/safety/pedbike/pedbike.htm
  • National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Pedestrian Safety Program www.nhtsa.dot.gov/people/injury/pedbimot/ped
  • U.S. Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board (Access Board) www.access-board.gov
State
  • Connecticut Department of Transportation Bicycle and Pedestrian Web Page www.dot.state.ct.us/bureau/pp/ docs/bike
Other
  • Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals www.apbp.org
  • National Center for Bicycling and Walking www.bikefed.org
  • National Safety Council Partnership for a Walkable America www.nsc.org/walkable.htm
  • Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center www.pedbikeinfo.org www.walkinginfo.org www.bicyclinginfo.org
  • Trails and Greenways Clearinghouse www.trailsandgreenways.org

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PAGE 7

Article Title: From Our Resource Library
To request any of the following materials, please use the enclosed form or contact the Connecticut Transportation Institute’s Technology Transfer Center by phone at 860-486-5400, by fax at 860-486-2399, or by e-mail at smerrall@engr.uconn.edu. Publications are free while supplies last. Videotapes and CD-ROMs may be borrowed free of charge for two weeks.

PUBLICATION
A Walkable Community, Federal Highway Administration, Pub. No. FHWA-SA-00-10. This brochure provides a snapshot on designing for a walkable community. Creating a walkable community is much more that just sidewalks; it is important to understand the needs and characteristics of pedestrians and the issues that affect their travel. A crash-type safety countermeasure matrix is featured with related graphics. More detailed information on each of the 60+ countermeasures illustrated in the brochure can be found on the Safer Journey CD-ROM in the library section. The brochure is intended for safety practitioners, advocates, and other special road users who want to create walkable/bikeable communities.

CD-ROMS
Pedestrian/Bicycle Safety Resource Set, Federal Highway Administration, Pub. No. FHWA-SA-00-005. This CD-ROM contains a library of information on how to improve pedestrian/ bicyclist safety in communities across the nation. Included in the set is information on facility design, planning, guidelines, good practices, and tools to aid in problem identification, and countermeasures development. The CD-ROM contains about 15,000 pages of information classified by various categories (e.g., design, planning, outreach, tools, etc.) and is intended for safety practitioners and other advocates who want to create walkable/ bikeable communities.

Safer Journey: Interactive Pedestrian Safety Awareness, Federal Highway Administration, Pub. No. FHWA-SA-00-009. This interactive CD-ROM takes the user through various pedestrian safety scenarios encountered every day across America. It has been developed to improve the level of pedestrian knowledge for all road users (including schools, driver education groups, enforcement, etc.) and safety practitioners. The CDROM activities include the Journey, the Quiz, and a library of resources. During the Journey section, the user interacts with the software to determine the outcome of the scenario. A crash-type safety countermeasure matrix is included in the library section.

VIDEOTAPE
Pedestrian Safety: What You Can Do, Federal Highway Administration, 9 minutes. This video examines many common urban and rural pedestrian safety problems and identifies countermeasures for each problem. It also depicts the common problems faced by various age groups and by the handicapped and identifies sources of additional information.

Article Title: Training Pays Off

Roundabout Design (Professional Development Series)
“The course was very hands-on. The use of real world examples was much better than a textbook hypothetical. I have had the opportunity to incorporate 2 different roundabouts into a recent project. They have been very well received by other engineers and by our clients.” - Rudolfo Franciamone, Purcell Associates

“I was very impressed with the course and the instructor. It was a real hands-on ‘nuts & bolts’ approach. I brought back many working tools that I can use in my current position. This workshop fit like a glove with the first one I attended last year on Traffic Calming and Neighborhood design.” - William Brown, Town of Greenwich

Surveying
“I really enjoyed this hands-on experience. It was very well done.” - Participant Evaluation

“A Great Workshop—Very Good Instructor” - Participant Evaluation

Managing the Small Highway Department (Road Master Program)
“Really enjoyed this workshop. The instructor was interesting, and easy to listen to. I was never bored.” - Ernie Orgera, City of Stamford

“I truly enjoyed this workshop and can see some shortcomings that I can improve upon.” - Participant Evaluation

“Just wanted to say that this class was very helpful. This is a wonderful teacher, very lively and teaches at our level of understanding.” - Participant Evaluation

Technology Transfer Expo 2001
“It was nice to see the show take place again! The fact that it was a combined effort between CHSSA and the Technology Transfer Center made it a unique experience that I enjoyed very much. I found the event to be both educational and entertaining. The hands on demonstrations and participation allowed you to get a real feel for the equipment. I think the backhoe rodeo was challenging and amusing to all who watched and participated. All in all I would say the affair was a success and I look forward to next years show.” - Ralph Winn, Town of Windsor Locks

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Published by the:
Connecticut Transportation Institute
Technology Transfer Center
Phone: 860-486-5400
Fax: 860-486-2399
Web: www.cti.uconn.edu

Supported through a cooperative effort of the Connecticut Department of Transportation and the Federal Highway Administration’s Local Technical Assistance Program (LTAP) to provide information on the latest transportation technology to Connecticut’s state and local government officials.

Program Manager: Donna Shea (shea@engr.uconn.edu)
Workshop Coordinator: Mary McCarthy (shea@engr.uconn.edu)
Information Services Coordinator/Editor: Stephanie Merrall (shea@engr.uconn.edu)

      
Technology Transfer Center
270 Middle Turnpike, Unit 5202
Storrs, CT 06269-5202
(860) 486-5400